Starting in the year 2000 and for the next seven years I worked extensively on researching how every single player that played for the Montreal Canadiens, became a Montreal Canadien. Following is a story, first printed in 2007 with a few changes to update. I look forward to any response. 

 The Montreal Canadiens have won 24 Stanley Cups in their history. Depending on who you ask many of these were attributed to a special draft of French Canadien players that the Habs and only the Habs were able to partake in year after year through out the history of the NHL.

The question re the Habs and their so called French Canadian ‘advantage’ has been so botched up over the years you would think that the Canadiens should have won 30-40 Stanley Cups with this incredible advantage.

In the early days of the NHL, in fact through the first several decades of the leagues existence, many things were done to try and help franchises that were in trouble. Loaning players from one team to another, financial aid, facilitating transfers to other cities, all were moves that were done to sustain a franchise if at all possible. Bottom line, when a team was in trouble the league would do it’s best to try and figure out a way to help. Some of these decisions kept franchises afloat in modern times. In the era that is known as the Original Six,  ( 1942-1967) the five remaining NHL teams were asked to help Chicago during a particular bad stretch for them in the mid 1950′s. In 1955 when things were at the most dire, Montreal made one of the more significant contributions when they made available a rookie on their roster named Eddie Litzenberger who not only went on to win the Calder Trophy as rookie-of-the-year with the Hawks but he was Chicago’s captain when they won their second last Cup in 1961.

 The California Seals and the Pittsburgh Penguins were two other franchises who were helped by the NHL in the 1970’s and even as recently as this past decade the NHL has helped keep afloat Ottawa,  Buffalo and of course the mess that is Phoenix.

 In 1935 the Montreal Canadiens nearly folded. The Depression had already claimed several franchises including the older version of the Ottawa Senators. What the NHL’s brain trust decided to do was they would attempt to help Montreal’s attendance and thereby hopefully their bottom line financially so they decided that the Montreal Canadiens could take any two players from the Provinceof Quebec in a special draft. This fact is substantiated in the NHL Guide and Record book, at the front of each year’s guide, no matter which one you own, under the history of the league section.

 There was one rider however. None of these players could have already been previously signed to a C form (confirmation form) with any other club. At this time in the NHL and right through the late 60′s amateur players were signed by NHL teams to A, B or C forms and then placed on their appropriate junior clubs or minor pro clubs depending on their age. There was no draft until 1963. The letters simply meant different classifications of rights that the parent NHL team controlled. One of the most extreme case of this was Bobby Orr. Orr who signed a C form three weeks before his 14th birthday with the Boston Bruins. He was so young his parent’s signature was required. When he turned 14 he began playing for Boston’s junior sponsored team, the Oshawa Generals. That’s how Orr became a Bruin.

The NHL Guide states that this special draft was only in place for three years. My research indicates that it may have been in place for as many as seven seasons however that is not 100% confirmed. My research indicates that not one player who Montreal protected during this time frame ever played a minute in the NHL. Reason being, anybody who could tie their skates and chew gum at the same time were already long signed by other NHL teams including the Canadiens who certainly were not going to survive solely with this rule. The hope was that there would be a spark of interest in the hockey fan base after Montreal signed one of these French Canadian players. It would be a bonus if he could play a bit. The thought was that this could help attendance and thereby help Montreal. Unfortunately it never did, in fact Montreal slipped even further into an abyss.  

What really helped Montrealat that time were two shrewd moves. A trade by the Habs GM, appropriately a man named Savard, Ernest Savard, no relation to Serge, who made a deal with the Montreal Maroons which brought the Habs Toe Blake and a few years later the signing of Elmer Lach to a C form, who was from Saskatchewan by the way. He was signed after the Rangers and Leafs both passed on him. Lach attended their camps first.

There were other moves which turned their fortune around. Montreal’s GM in the 1940’s, Tommy Gorman,  can thank his lucky stars  his offer of a trade for what seemed to be a very brittle but explosive goal scorer name Maurice Richard was never followed up by the other GM’s.  Richard, who had signed a C form with Montreal in 1938 suffered injury after injury in his first three years of pro. Gorman tried to unload him but nobody wanted him. This fact is substantiated in the movie ‘The Rocket.’ These were the three major reasons for the success of the Habs over a nearly two decade span – not some bull crap rule that although was well intentioned did nothing to extend Montreal’s stay in the NHL at that time. In fact they were even worse in 1940 when they missed the playoffs again finishing seventh with twenty-five points, five years after the implementation of this so-called ‘French Canadian rule.’

The last two pieces of the puzzle for the Habs success in the modern era as we know it happened in 1946 and 1947 respectively. With the French Canadian rule now rescinded and Montreal rolling with two Cup victories in a three year span another matter of good timing would help the Montreal Canadiens for years to come. Thank you Toronto Maple Leafs.Toronto owner Conn Smythe fired Frank Selke Sr. and Montreal quickly hired him as General Manager. Selke had a vision about a series of teams in the minor leagues that would be stocked with players that Montreal would sign to C forms. These minor league teams and the players on them were soon to be known as farm teams.  This was the origin of the farm system as we know it today. It took the rest of the NHL 2-3 years to catch on to this idea but they did and they’ve all benefited from it but Montreal had a tremendous head start and in some instances they purchased the rights to an entire league to get a certain player. They did this for Jean Beliveau and Bobby Rousseau. Beliveau was an amateur player, playing for the Quebec Aces. He was quite content in Quebec playing senior hockey for the Aces as there were only two players in the NHL making more money than Big Jean, Rocket Richard and Gordie Howe. What the Canadiens did to finally get him was they bought the entire league, the QSHL ( Quebec Senior Hockey League) and turned it pro. Beliveau had signed a C form with Montreal in 1947. When Montreal GM Frank Selke was able to sign Beliveau in 1953 he offered up one of the best quotes in hockey history.  As he put  it, “I opened up the vault and said help yourself Jean!” Great quote.

 The move in 1947 was the hiring of Sam Pollock. Pollock came under the tutelage of Selke and finally in 1963 became his successor as GM of the Canadiens. In 1963 the NHL finally realized there was a glut of players, post Second World War 2 births, that were coming of age to play in the NHL and even with the A, B and C form stones were being left unturned. For the first time a league wide draft was implemented. There was never any thought that this would one day become the life blood of the NHL. At the time the six NHL teams would draft in a rotating order any player who had not previously been signed.  A player drafted in those early years who later was a high profile star for Montreal was Ken Dryden. Dryden was selected by the Boston Bruins  in the second year of the draft, 1964.  He indicated he was going the NCAA route, very unusual in those days. Montreal thought the lanky 17 year old had potential so they traded two of their draft picks in the same draft,  Guy Allen and Paul Reid and traded them to Boston for Dryden’s rights. 

The year before, the first year of the draft In 1963, the French Canadian rule was brought back for the Montreal Canadiens. The Habs negotiated for it and were successful in getting it back on the books but it provided little help.

I interviewed the late Sam Pollock for this story.  “We never drafted one player under this rule allowance until 1968,” stated Sam Pollock. “All sorts of French players had been signing with other NHL teams for years.  Marcel Pronovost with Detroit, Camille Henry and Edgar Laprade with the Rangers. Jean Ratelle and Rod Gilbert with the Rangers, Bernie Parent with Boston, even Toronto took Dave Keon from Rouyn-Noranda,” Pollock said.

I interviewed Marcel Pronovost for this story at the NHL draft in Florida in 2001.  “Montreal only came to talk to me after I signed with Detroit,” said Marcel Pronovost. “I was happy to be a Red Wing and later a Toronto Maple Leaf,” stated Mr. Pronovost. For those of you with internet access you may want to check out this site;

http://www.hockeydraftcentral.com/1963/63facts.html

Information on the draft year 1963 and subsequent draft years including Montreal’s priority protections can all be found here. This site which is extremely well done and organized will show that Montreal’s first priority pick under the French Canadian rule was Michel Plasse in 1968. In 1969, it was determined that this would be the final year of the draft in this manner and the sponsorship of Junior A teams would cease to be. All players were to be 20 years of age or older and they would be eligible for a Universal Amateur Draft. Montreal was given one final kick at the French Canadian can and they made the most of it by selecting Rejean Houle and Marc Tardif. That was it for the French rule. By then Sam Pollock or Trader Sam as he was known, was working magic year in and year out on draft day by flipping players in Montreal’s farm system that had been so expertly set up years before by Mr. Selke and ran by Pollock, for draft picks. Players like Guy Lafleur, Steve Shutt and Mario Tremblay were selected with picks that Pollock acquired through trades.

That’s the history of how Montreal evolved from nearly dying in the mid 1930′s through the last of their glory days in the late 1970′s. The Habs had a pretty good run in the decade of the 1980′s, with one Cup, another trip to the finals and four trips to the semi-finals. The 1990′s, with the Cup in 1993 notwithstanding, were a much tougher time as we well know. That’s another chapter for another time. I hope this helps clear up any misconception. I believe this fallacy was born primarily by frustrated anti-Montreal fans who for decades suffered through parade after Stanley Cup parade.  Feel free to go to my Ultimate Hockey website which can be found at www.ultimatehockeynetwork.com and email me any questions, thoughts or findings you may have had if you ever researched this urban legend.

 

Liam Maguire

Liam Maguire

By the time Liam Maguire was ten, he had accumulated and stored a vast supply of hockey data. At the age of sixteen, the passion turned into an obsession of studying, memorizing, reading and researching even the smallest hockey trivia detail.

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28 comments

  1. Rob Drapeau

    Excellent research Liam. I always wondered about that, mind you I only heard it from Lowell Green. Now I know the real story

    • Liam Maguire
      Author

      I’m pretty sure I told you all this during one of our many trips to Montreal Rob…..you must have just forgot, probably partying a bit too much. :) lol…thanks buddy, I appreciate your comments very much.

  2. Jim McArthur

    Great story Liam, I was one of those guys. My dad was a huge habs fan and I remember every time I would bring up these “untrue” stats, he would give me the violin sign. LOL.. There is one story I hear about Rocket Richard but am unsure of it’s validity. It is said that Montreal Doctors got him out of WWII service by stating that he had flat feet and could not serve in combat.. I always wondered why he could skate like a bugger but not walk in combat boots? Which, would be far more comfortable. Either way, the Habs won only one cup during WWII, so this story, however true or false is quite moot..

    • Liam Maguire
      Author

      hi Jim, not true as I understand it. The Rocket tried to enlist a half dozen times. They showed this in the movie actually. But in those days they were only taking able bodied men, 100% physical condition. He was rarely that especially in those early years of the war. What always amazed me, is that the NHL was a 7 team league through half of the war, with about 15 bodies on each squad, that’s a 105 men that were not admitted for service yet all we ever hear about is the Rocket….you had Hart Trophy winners, scoring leaders, captains of Cup winning teams in 40, 41, 42, 43, all before the Rocket really did anything in the NHL….just goes to show the level of anti-Montreal rhetoric and bias and frankly borderline hate that exists with many fans…..very unfortunate.

      • Jim McArthur

        Very unfortunate indeed. Reading up on him, seeing the movie and listening to my fathers stories, I’ve grown to admire him and what he accomplished. As a life long Red Wing fan, I’m not lost on the friction between he and Gordie, however, I know there was a lot of respect between them in their older years. Gordie was blessed with a durable body while the Rocket seemed to overcome something every time he turned around. My father used to say he was as tough as a two dollar steak. Thanks for the info, keep the stories coming, my morning coffee will never be the same..

        • Liam Maguire
          Author

          Thanks for the comments Jim. Lots more to come. There’s no question it was as fierce a rivalry as existed in sports between two men. And it was relevant for a good decade and change..Drop a line anytime.

  3. Alan Hirsch

    Perhaps Pollack’s best move occurred at the end of the 1970-71 regular season. As stated in this article, Montreal had acquired Oakland’s first pick in the 1971 draft two years earlier. During the season, Oakland and LA were battling for last overall spot and the coveted first-overall draft pick. If LA had finished last, they would have surely grabbed Lafleur with the first overall pick. Had Oakland finished last, Montreal would grab Lafleur. To ensure the latter, Pollack “traded” (he gave him away!) Ralph Backstrom to LA with about eight weeks left in the season. Backstrom helped LA win a few games and LA climbed out of the cellar while Oakland finished last. The Guy Lafleur era was one of the most exciting and productive in Habs’ history.

    • Liam Maguire
      Author

      Yessir, that would rank as probably his best move. My article was more to do with the time period that the C form existed but no question, the initial move of acquiring the Seals pick, which was done on my 11th birthday in fact, May 22, 1970 and the subsequent dealing of Backstrom to LA were the best of Pollock no question.

      • Victor Levy

        Hi Liam – Thanks for this treasure trove of info – given that it’s truly from the source, it’s authenticity is undeniable.

        I would like to point out that I think Allan’s comment was to show that Guy Lafleur was not obtained via any sort of “special rule” in place to favor the Habs but rather through the very shrewd business acumen of a certain Sam Pollock.

        But I could be wrong ;)

        • Liam Maguire
          Author

          hi Victor, not at all, I believe that’s exactly what he was saying however I stated that at the end of my article. Lafleur was taken via the NHL draft. It was by far arguably the best of Sam Pollock’s many great moves, no doubt about it. Thank you.

  4. Alan Hirsch

    Victor is correct. Many people believe Lafleur was drafted because he was French. Liam’s wonderful article ends abruptly with the end of the 1969 draft. For many, the years get morphed together with little to distinguish 1969 from 1971. I wanted to point out that Lafleur was not a priority selection. Pollack maneuvered brilliantly to land him.

    • Liam Maguire
      Author

      Correct Alan and thank you. Although I did mention that Lafeur was a draft pick that Pollock acquired through trades. It may appear as if I ended abruptly but it was intention to go only as far as the so called rule or advantage existed. Thanks though, very much for the comments. I’m very, very familar with every single trade and acquistion in Montreal Canadien history. :)

  5. bob miller

    Liam..This BS myth will follow Habs fans until the end of time. I have heard it from everyone from my barber to an old time school teacher of mine to a radio host to…to to… Stange, but it DOES seem to be a Maple Leafs disease (spreading the myth,I mean). I’m surprised it isn’t alluded to every Saturday by those “totally unbiased” commentators on Hockey Night In Toronto………I have been a Habs fan since that night in April of 1954 when Tony Leswick scored the winning goal as Detroit beat Montreal to win the Stanley Cup. To an 11 year old kid listening to the game on the old Brown Silvertone in my small upstairs bedroom in small town Nova Scotia, it was “us” (Ccanada) against “them” (USA) and that’s how I actually became a Montreal fan. Subsequent years following that great team of the late 1950s did nothing to shake my allegiance. In a box in my basement I still have autographed individual photos of that great collection of talent and at one time ( possibly somewhere in the rafters …) is a hockey stick autographed by all the team members and sent to me after I, dumb kind that I was, wrote a letter to Mr. Selke asking how much it would cost to get one. Lo and behold…..it arrived at my door, but……foolish kid that I was…I managed to break it. Years later the autographs faded so you really could not read them…but what a marvellous thing it was to receive. I also used to ask for and receive (also from the Maple Leafs) the large calendars with team photos and other such items. For the life of me I do not know where those went. I used to bleed Montreal red, white and blue but, as i age …and hockey has became more business than sport, it has become increasingly difficult to “live and die” with the team. This year’s version is particularly hard to support. One reads over the years how incompetent Rejean Houle was. Maybe so… but as bad as some of his teams were, they never finished LAST in their conference. I was happy as a pig in the proverbial when Bob Gainey was hired (in 2003???) but I am afraid he failed to come close to living up to expectations. Giving up most of the team’s UFAs and getting ZERO in return was not exactly not a high point in historical team management. However, Liam, its always great to read your offerings. If I ever get to Ottawa again I would hope to visit your restaurant.
    Regards….bob miller

    • Liam Maguire
      Author

      Thanks for a great note Bob, very much appreciated. It is interesting how it’s continued over time. It’s the consumate urban legend with nobody having any sense of it’s origin. Passed down through generations of people not in the know…I did what I could to shed some light on the situation. Getting those names on C forms was the scouts main job in those days. It’s interesting also when you point out that after Toronto’s Cup win in 1967 they were in fact only two Cups behind Montreal for the overall lead in Cup history. How was this advantage such an advantage?? Just ridiculous. Leswick’s goal is truly one of the more amazing moments. To think in OT of game seven to win the Cup and it deflects off of Doug Harvey’s glove…incredible. Your story, I love it, I just love stuff like that. A former principal of my children’s school in Manotick, Ontario had a similar story about getting a letter back, not a stick as in your case but a letter from Mr. Selke. He showed it to me, it’s just gold, pure gold. Sorry to hear your’s has gone by the way side, would have been tough and incredible foresight on your part to hang on to it in mint condition. I would have done the exact same thing you did. :) Gainey was hired in ’03. Took them from 77 points to 104 and first in the East in five years, which was his plan. Unfortunately they could not get past that second round and began to slide after that as did Bob, in and around the time of the terrible tragedy that befell his daughter. It is a mess of epic proportions right now….The rumour is they will clean house after the season, one can only hope. Drop a line anytime Bob. take care.

      Liam

      • bob miller

        Liam..I found the old stick in considerable poorer condtion than “mint”. At this moment I am trying to glue the broken blade. The autographs on the handle are barely visible and for someone not knowing they are the names of the greatest collecton of hockey stars in my lifetime they would not mean anything.The wood has darkened so much that the names are almost unreadable. BUT I KNOW WHAT THEY ARE!!. What wonderful days the 1950s were, Liam. I mentioned previously about being from smaltown Nova Scotia (that being Oxford in Cumberlamd County..near Amherst), You may or may not recall a piece I wrote a few years ago about a former phys ed teacher (Connie MacNeill) at my high school who scored three goals in six seconds during a college game……well, I did a piece a couple years ago on (as far as I know) the only NHLer ever to be born in Oxford…that being goaltender Claude Burke (Bourque in Montreal). I’ll send it along at another address in case you have a few minutes (and have nothing relating to the Habs to read)!!
        Go Habs go……and let us as quickly as possible get this terrible season over with..

        bob miller

        • Liam Maguire
          Author

          hi Bob,
          I most certainly do recall that story. I had it on my old site, which was taken down inadvertantly before I could retain or save many of those stories. That was a fantastic story and I recall it totally. Please do send Claude Bourque ( Burke ) love to see it. I believe liam@lmuh.com will get to me…..if not, let me know through here and I’ll get another email for you. love to see it. Thanks again,

          Liam

  6. Alan Hirsch

    I am not a Don Cherry fan and deplore his recent rant but…look how few Quebec players play for Montreal, how few Ontario players are with the Leafs. And in the states–in the three major hockey-player producing markets, Boston, Minnesota and Detroit, look how few locals there are on those teams. The Tom Gilbert to Minnesota trade was hailed as a big deal because it brought a native son home. Maybe it is time to reinstate some kind of territorial draft. Or if you find that notion in 2012 ridiculous, maybe it’s time for us to be less geocentric.

    What say you all?

    • Liam Maguire
      Author

      hi Allan,

      we really can’t reinstitute a territorial draft. There was such a thing, over the years, it was one of the many things they tried at different times for this very reason, to get home grown talent into local markets but it was scrapped as to big an advantage- obviously – for Montreal and Toronto. I really think at the end of the day it behooves the GM’s of the respective teams to do what they can depending on where they are running a team. For example for years and years we couldn’t get the GM’s here in Ottawa to look at a local kid much less draft one or trade for one. It was the most bizzare thing I’d ever seen. It was a running joke. Now since Bryan Murray has been at the helm it’s like he has made it a mission to ensure that he has either local content or at the very least players with a connection to the Ottawa 67′s. Guess what, it’s probably responsible for hundreds of extra seats sold game in and game out. You can’t ignore the obvious home town connection and that means to family and friends. Anyway, re Toronto and the outburst by Grapes, you have to admit, being the only NHL team out of 30 currently without one Ontario born player on their roster is conspicious. We’ll see how it plays out next year for the Leafs cause they are done, once again, for this season.

  7. Alan Hirsch

    Hi Liam,

    Given that Brian Burke has drafted eight Ontario-born players (8-1/2 if you count Tyler Biggs) in the last three drafts, he really cannot be held to account (yet) for not having enough local content on the team. I am sure he made a big pitch for Nash; I am also sure he has tried to sign several free agents; he tried to move up in the 2008 Entry Draft to get Tavares. The question of free agents is an interesting one. How many Ontario-born free agents want to play for Toronto right now? I think the answer is only a very few hearty souls would venture back to their hometown right now. John Ferguson Jr. seemed to have an aversion against local talent. He wasn’t the only one. You mention Ottawa’s past GMs. Didn’t Risebrough seem to have a similar aversion against Minnesota-born players?

    Some organizations seem to favor a certain type of background–Detroit Swedes and Europeans. Philadelphia–Western- and French-Canadians. New Jersey–American college players. There are many other examples. Reinstating a territorial draft would guarantee local talent remains local. Maybe each year each team has one optional pick in exchange for their drafting position. Perhaps it can be weighted by territory so the Florida teams are not penalized for lacking local talent.

    Perhaps the time has come to reinstate some kind of territorial draft.

    • Liam Maguire
      Author

      It’s an interesting question and thought Alan. I certainly never heard of Doug Riseborough having any type of aversion to players from the area in Minnesota. I don’t know if that’s the ever the case, more so as you state, a preference over another player. IE, if you have two players of relative equal ability would you take the local kid or the other one and seemingly certainly in Ottawa here for a number of years- it was ‘the other kid,’ maybe that does exist. I think your point is a good one about teams cultivating locally, the Burke-Cherry situation notwithstanding. There is one very saliant point that is omitted from all of that kerfuffle two weeks ago; Burke in his interview with Ron MacLean on the pregame show was bemoaning how the Ontario kids come in to TO and light it up. Coming from a man running the roster with no current Ontario kids it was a curious comment and that’s what set Grapes off. That’s rarely been stated.

      As for the territorial protection, again, I don’t think that flies given the desparity in the areas. Perhaps as you say compensation could be worked out for the lack of players in a certain area and defining the boundaries in NY State and with New Jersey I suppose are doable but I don’t see it as realistic myself. A nice idea but I just don’t see it working.

      • Alan Hirsch

        Hi Liam,

        If you check Risebrough’s record, you will see he has shied away from Minnesota native sons and taken “the other player.” in a manner not unlike the Ottawa situation.

        I agree with you on Burke. He stepped in it himself when he made his ill thought-out comments about how psyched-up visiting Ontario players are when they come to Toronto. Ron Maclean followed up with “Well, then why don’t you get some?” The New Jersey thing is difficult. Bobby Ryan would have gone to the Flyers and perhaps Van Riemsdyk and Bobby Sanguinetti would have gone to the Flyers also although all are New Jersey boys. By the way, I was playing in a men’s league in Pennsauken, NJ with guys like Eklund (my former teammate whose real name I cannot reveal) in the late ’90s while an eight-year old Ryan played in the same rink. The idea has many flaws but should be considered (finally).

        Thanks again for the many provocative and historic articles,

        Alan

        • Liam Maguire
          Author

          Eklund the trade rumour specialist?? I met him at the draft a few years ago if that’s who you are referring to. He told me his real name, I’ve since forgotten it. Very cool story though. I’ve seen a lot of NHLérs play at a young age but not 8 years old. I’ll have to take your word for it on Doug’s drafting. I’m not going to go back and try and check that but seeing as it’s happened in other spots, noteably right here in Ottawa it certainly seems to be something that’s not as uncommon, inexplicably may I add, as we may think. Maybe you’re on to something, as much as I can’t see it but if rejuvenating fan bases or energizing them with an infusion of local talent is possible it should be considered, that much I certainly will agree with.

          • Alan Hirsch

            Hi Liam,

            Yes, Eklund the rumor monger who runs the web site “Hockeybuzz.com.” His real name is quite forgettable but I will not be the one to spoil his illusion. He was the goalie on our B-league team. I used to wear a Pelle Eklund game-worn sweater to the rink once in a while. I believe he got the idea of “Eklund” from me!.

            As far as a local draft, the NBA had a local draft and the Warriors got the great Wilt Chamberlain via the local draft. Now that the US is producing so many NHL-level players from Chicago, Detroit, New Jersey, New York, Wisconsin, etc in addition to the traditional areas of Minn and Mass, it is time to ,once again, try it. If it doesn’t work they can change or eliminate the rule–just the way they are doing with the trapezoid or possibly the red line.

          • Liam Maguire
            Author

            I believe I forgot his name moments after hearing it. :) But he’s fashioned a solid niche for himself and that’s all that matters. Good on him. As for the local draft, well it’s been a nice tidy little discussion but you and I both know it’s not going to happen. I don’t see how the disparity in locations can be covered off. Toronto being able to protect this McDavid kid for example, is simply not a fair trade off even in return for some sort of equalization of draft choices. It had it’s day 50 years ago but in a 30 team pro league it just can’t work. Over to you for the last word my friend.

  8. Ray G.

    Hey Liam,

    I just wanted to say thanks for the amazing information and research…..I had found this article years ago on http://www.Liam.ca for the very same reason you mention , the level of anti-Montreal rhetoric and bias towards the HABS. Especially from Leaf fans (right Alex F.).

    Well today, I had to re-use it once again…only to find out that my precious bookmark named “The French Canadian Fiction Rule” no longer worked and got redirected to your new site……

    Well….I am very happy indeed to find it once again with a few simple clicks!!!!

    Not only did i read it again..but also found other very interesting stories in reading the comments left from other readers, specifically from Alan Hirsch about Sam Pollock .

    Thanks Again Liam and readers!!!!!!

    Oh and BTW…I’ve updated my bookmark ;)

    • Liam Maguire
      Author

      Hey Doug!! Great to hear from you buddy. Things are great. You were the very first guy I ever contacted via the internet to talk hockey. Could it be 17 years?? What’s going on pal?